5 gardens to see in Italy

Parco del Castello di Miramare

Parco del Castello di Miramare. Image source: http://blog.sadesign.it

GARDENS TO SEE IN ITALY: 5 ITALIAN GARDENS TO VISIT IN SPRING

Gardens to see. In my blog I often write about Italy, museums, villas and castles surrounded by large parks.
If there’s one thing I do love doing when beautiful days arrive and the air becomes warmer, it’s discovering gardens, those gardens where you can sit on the grass or where you can be catapulted back in time and relive ancient stories.

If you have already visited at least one of these gardens, you know what I mean.
On the contrary, if you have never entered one of these gardens, you’d better look into your agenda and leave as soon as you have a weekend off.
I made a list of the 5 Italian gardens you must visit.

1 – THE GARDENS OF THE PALACE OF VENARIA-Venaria Reale (Piedmont)

The project was commissioned by Charles Emmanuel II of Savoy in the 17th century, and represents the greatness of the Piedmontese royal family.
What remains of the original and following structures makes the park harmonious, where the Baroque taste is embedded in a park which looks to the future.

Tickets: 25€ for a visit in the Palace, gardens anche exhibitions.

Giardini Reali | Torino

Image source: http://www.joggingroutes.org

2 – MIRAMARE PARK- Trieste (Friuli-Venezia Giulia)

The park was built in 1856 by order of Maximilian of Habsburg, who transformed an uncultivated space into a marvellous garden.
The park stands on a rocky promontory overlooking the Gulf of Trieste and surrounds Miramare Castle, built on a cliff high above the sea.
Tickets: free entrance at the gardens.

READ ALSO: On Sunday at the museum: Miramare Castle.

Miramare | Musei Trieste

Image source: ZonzoFox.com

3 – GIARDINO BARDINI- Florence (Tuscany)

It’s the Belvedere of Florence.
A Baroque staircase, six fountains, and a view on the city make this garden one of my favourite.
Tickets: with 7€ you see the gardens anche also Giardino di Boboli.

READ ALSO: What to do in Florence: an itinerary.

Giardino Bardini | Firenze

Image source: https://aspasiascircle.wordpress.com

4 – Villa Borghese – Rome (Lazio)

Villa Borghese is the third largest public park in Rome.
It covers 80 hectares and occupies a large part of Pincian Hill and a small part of Campus Martius (Campo Marzio).
It is a huge area and contains various buildings which have various functions. Besides, this green area includes both gardens in the Italian taste and in the English taste, fountains and small lakes.
Tickets: Fre entrance.

READ ALSO: 5 things about Villa Borghese in Rome.

Villa Borghese | lago | Roma

Image source: ItalyGuides.it

5 – THE GARDEN OF CASA CUSENI- Taormina (Sicily)

In the early 1900s the english painter Robert Kitson decided to build this house in Taormina, and transformed it into a salon for international artists.
The house hosted Pablo Picasso, Henry Moore, Ezra Pound and many more artists and intellectuals, who while sitting in the garden could talk, and at the same time admire a landscape which still today leave you speechless.

Tickets: 15 €

Giardino Casa Cuseni | Taormina

Image source: Casa Cuseni.it

 

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6 thoughts on “5 gardens to see in Italy

    • Solo la parte del giardino all’italiana non ha fiori, perché è in corso un restauro per recuperare la vegetazione.
      Il resto del Parco c’è ed è in buono stato.

  1. Da quanto tempo non vai al parco del castello di miramare? Adesso sembra più un giardino dopo il passaggio di attila, grazie alla gestione scellerata del governo italiano

    • Ci vado spesso al Castello di Miramare e ho pubblicato qualche foto anche della mia visita al Castello (le trovi QUI —> http://www.theartpostblog.com/una-domenica-al-museo-castello-di-miramare/ ).
      L’unica parte che non è in fiore è la parte del giardino all’italiana, perchè tutta la vegetazione è stata attaccata da un parassita.
      Quando capitano queste cose c’è poco da fare, si deve rifare tutto e i giardini storici richiedono attenzioni speciali.
      Si tratta di un restauro ma nel capo della Botanica. Non basta rimettere in piedi un pezzo di marmo.
      Il resto del Parco però resta stupendo.

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